Colloquia and Seminars

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Upcoming Colloquia & Seminars

  • CSpecial Guest Lecture: Graduate Studies - Why Bother?

    CSpecial Guest Lecture: Graduate Studies - Why Bother?

    Speaker:
    Oded Cohn (IBM Research, Haifa)
    Date:
    Tuesday, 29.4.2014, 12:30
    Place:
    Taub Auditorium 2

    Oded Cohn, a Technion CS graduate who is now a Vice President at IBM and the Director of IBM Research - Haifa Lab, will share his perspective on technology career development, academia vs. industry, startup vs. large corporation, research and innovation. In particular, he will discuss the question of why is it important to continue studying for advanced degrees, MSc and PhD, in todays employment environment which is happily offering positions for Technion CS/EE Bachelors. Examples of Information Technology based innovations that matter to the world, which are grounded in deep science, will be presented.

  • Joint analysis of two biological networks using module maps

    Speaker:
    Ron Shamir
    Date:
    Tuesday, 29.4.2014, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337-8 Taub Bld.
    Link:
    http://www.cs.technion.ac.il/~colloq/20140429_14_30_Shamir.html
  • ceClub: Sampling and Inference Problems for Big Data in the Internet and Beyond

    Speaker:
    Nick Duffield (Rutgers University)
    Date:
    Wednesday, 30.4.2014, 11:30
    Place:
    EE Meyer Building TBA

    Massive graph datasets are used operationally by providers of internet, social network and search services. Sampling can reduce storage requirements as well as query execution times, while prolonging the useful life of the data for baselining and retrospective analysis. Here, sampling must mediate between the characteristics of the data, the available resources, and the accuracy needs of queries. Inference methods can be used to fuse datasets which individually provide only an incomplete view of the system under study. In this talk we describe some successes in applying these ideas to massive Internet measurements and some potential new applications to inverse problems in urban informatics, and to bioinformatics.

    Bio:
    Nick Duffield joined Rutgers University as a Research Professor in 2013. Previously, he worked at AT &T Labs Research, where he was a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff and an AT &T Fellow, and held faculty positions in Europe. He works on network and data science, particularly the acquisition, analysis and applications of operational network data. He was formerly chair of the IETF Working Group on Packet Sampling, and an associate editor of the IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. He is an IEEE Fellow and was a co-recipient of the ACM Sigmetrics Test of Time Award in both 2012 and 2013 for work in network tomography. He was recently TPC Co-Chair of IFIP Performance 2013, a keynote speaker at the 25th International Teletraffic Congress in Shanghai, China, and an invited speaker at the workshop on Big Data in the Mathematical Sciences in Warwick, UK.

  • CGGC Seminar: In Search of a Clifford Algebra as a Natural Framework for 3-Dimensional Computer Graphics

    Speaker:
    Ron Goldman (CS, Rice University)
    Date:
    Sunday, 4.5.2014, 13:00
    Place:
    Room 337-8 Taub Bld.

    In contemporary 3-dimensional computer graphics, the graphics pipeline consists of a sequence of affine transformations composed at the end with a single perspective projection. Typically, affine and projective transformations are represented by 4׳4 matrices, and 3-dimensional points and vectors are represented with four homogeneous coordinates. In this framework, quadric surfaces are also usually modeled by (symmetric) 4׳4 matrices.

    Recently, however, several authors (Dorst, Mann, Fontijne, Hildenbrand, Perwass, Rockwood, Vince) have suggested that Clifford algebra might provide a more natural, more powerful, more elegant algebraic framework for computer graphics than matrix algebra.

    We begin by presenting a brief introduction to Clifford algebra. We shall then investigate several standard models of Clifford algebra for 3-dimensions, including various homogeneous models as well as the conformal model and we will see that these algebras fail to include the full range of transformations used in the graphics pipeline. Furthermore, all of these models fail to incorporate general quadric surfaces as elements of the algebra. Based, however, on insights gained from investigating these basic models, we will show that there is a more universal variant of Clifford algebra for 3-dimensions that does indeed incorporate the full range of affine and projective transformations used in the graphics pipeline as well as the full suite of quadric surfaces.