TCE Special Guest Lecture: CANCELLED!

TCE Special Guest Lecture: CANCELLED!

Speaker:
Kaushik Roy (Purdue University)
Date:
Thursday, 25.5.2017, 11:30
Place:
EE Meyer Building 861

Advances in machine learning, notably deep learning, have led to computers matching or surpassing human performance in several cognitive tasks including vision, speech and natural language processing. However, implementation of such neural algorithms in conventional "von-Neumann" architectures are several orders of magnitude more area and power expensive than the biological brain. Exploring the new paradigm of computing necessitates a multi-disciplinary approach: exploration of new learning algorithms inspired from neuroscientific principles, developing network architectures best suited for such algorithms, new hardware techniques to achieve orders of improvement in energy consumption, and nanoscale devices that can closely mimic the neuronal and synaptic operations of the brain leading to a better match between the hardware substrate and the model of computation. In this presentation, we will discuss our work on spintronic device structures consisting of single-domain/domain-wall motion based devices for mimicking neuronal and synaptic units. Implementation of different neural operations with varying degrees of bio-fidelity (from "non-spiking" to "spiking" networks) and implementation of on-chip learning mechanisms (Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity) will be discussed. Additionally, we also propose probabilistic neural and synaptic computing platforms that can leverage the underlying stochastic device physics of spin-devices due to thermal noise. System-level simulations indicate ~100x improvement in energy consumption for such spintronic implementations over a corresponding CMOS implementation across different computing workloads.

Bio:
Kaushik Roy received B.Tech. degree in electronics and electrical communications engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India, and Ph.D. degree from the electrical and computer engineering department of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is currently the Edward G. Tiedemann Jr. Distinguished Professor of ECE at Purdue University. Dr. Roy has published more than 700 papers in refereed journals and conferences, holds 18 patents, supervised 75 PhD dissertations, and is co-author of two books on Low Power CMOS VLSI Design (John Wiley & McGraw Hill).

Dr. Roy received the National Science Foundation Career Development Award in 1995, IBM faculty partnership award, ATT/Lucent Foundation award, 2005 SRC Technical Excellence Award, SRC Inventors Award, Purdue College of Engineering Research Excellence Award, Humboldt Research Award in 2010, 2010 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Technical Achievement Award (Charles Doeser Award), Distinguished Alumnus Award from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur, Fulbright-Nehru Distinguished Chair, DoD Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellow (2014-2019), Semiconductor Research Corporation Aristotle award in 2015, and several best paper awards. Dr. Roy was a Purdue University Faculty Scholar (1998-2003). He was a Research Visionary Board Member of Motorola Labs (2002) and held the M. Gandhi Distinguished Visiting faculty at Indian Institute of Technology (Bombay) and Global Foundries visiting Chair at National University of Singapore. He is a fellow of IEEE.

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